How to Close a Sale: The Ultimate Guide For You

Updated: Oct 13, 2021

HOW TO CLOSE A SALE IS A VITAL SKILL TO HAVE FOR ANYONE WHO SIMPLY WANTS A JOB, A RAISE, TO SELL A PRODUCT OR SERVICE, OR TO GET ANOTHER PERSON TO DO ANYTHING!


Closing is what is required to ensure you get what you want in life, both professionally and personally!


So, are YOU ready to close?


This thing called “closing” isn’t just something that salespeople do but something that applies to every person.


Nothing truly happens until you’re able to engender the support, energy, and resources of others.

As harsh as it may seem, “the close” is what separates those who have from those who don’t have.


This critical and vital ability is what differentiates the dreamer from the person that realizes his dreams!


You may think that’s an overstatement, but the only reason you know the names of people like…

  • Abraham Lincoln

  • Henry Ford

  • Martin Luther King

  • Walt Disney

  • Bill Gates

  • Barack Obama

…is because they were able to close others on their ideas!


They were able to instill support from others so they could get their ideas backed by money, energy, and effort.

The art of closing the sale is a needed skill of anyone that wants to move their ideas, dreams, products, and services into the marketplace.




The first thing you need to know about closing is this:


SELLING IS NOT CLOSING


Have you ever met someone great at selling, demonstrating a product, building and talking about your company, but was terrible at closing the deal?

Maybe I am describing someone you work with or maybe that sounds like you.

Well, I understand because early in my selling career, I was good at the selling part and terrible at shutting down the deal.

There were times when I had everything going my way, I was confident my product was superior to everything else in the market, yet I didn’t even ask the client to buy the product.

Then one day, I was told: “ Chahat There is a big difference between selling the product and closing the deal. If you want to get good at both, you have to separate them as tasks.”


TWO THINGS TO CONSIDER ABOUT THE CLOSE:


#1 NO CLOSE MEANS NO COMMISSION


Look, if you don’t close you don’t get paid. Selling the product is where the value proposition is made, closing the deal is where the agreement is made. These are two completely different arts. The close is such a talent it must be practiced as a different skill from selling.


#2 NO CLOSE MEANS NO EXCHANGE


You must understand that when you don’t attempt to close you aren’t attempting to actually get your offer, service or product into the hands of your customer. Until you close, can you offer any real value. When I started to understand these two points and followed up with a commitment to become a master at closing, the transaction was when I became a well-paid professional in sales.


TOO MANY SALESPEOPLE SPEND TOO MUCH TIME SELLING AND NO TIME CLOSING


These two things—selling and closing—are completely different arts.

  • Selling requires you to sell features, options and get emotional involvement.

  • The close requires persistence and logic to make sense of getting your customer to make a decision.

Do you know how to create the bridge between selling and closing?

A bridge is something that is intended to reconcile or form a connection between two things.


If you are like any true sales professional, you are constantly looking for new ways to be more effective with your sales presentation.

One of the things I used to notice was that my sales team was presenting long after the buyer had seen enough. So, I took all of our presentations apart and broke them into five stages. At the end of each stage, I require them to ask a question, and this question is the bridge between selling and closing.

By using this simple bridge that I’m about to reveal, we dramatically increased the confidence of our sales team and our conversion rates.


HAVE YOU SEEN ENOUGH TO MAKE A DECISION?”


This works like a miracle with customers. They will either say, “no I haven’t,” allowing you to continue with the presentation, or you will close 80% faster than previously.

Sometimes you will find out you didn’t even have the right decision-makers in the room.

The “have you seen enough to make a decision” is a bridge between selling and closing because it’s a question that gets you in communication with the client on where they are in their information gathering /decision making process.



Believe me, you don’t want to continue presenting long after the buyer has seen enough. Sometimes the buyer decides to take action before he or she agrees to take action, and long before you even get involved with the customer.


This is an amazing phenomenon, and once you get your head wrapped around it, it will help you increase your sales. I know veteran salespeople that are unable to wrap their head around this and spend more time selling than necessary.


Consider the possibility that you are actually slowing the customer down from buying when you go on and on presenting.

I was recently in a presentation with a buddy of mine who makes upward of 20 Million in sales per year. While he was presenting his product to a customer of mine I interrupted him and asked, “have you seen enough to justify the price of Puneet's product?”


The customer said no and I told Puneet to continue. Puneet showed another feature and I asked the same question again, “have you seen enough to make a decision?”


This is the bridge between selling and closing. You need this bridge.


Now depending on your sales cycle, sales model, and possibly your product, this bridge could vary a little, so here are a few other similar bridges that we use that can accomplish different things.

  • What do you like about what you have seen up to this point?”

  • Up to this point, what problems do you see us helping out with?”

  • Have you seen enough to make sense of the investment?”

Whether you are selling cars or selling yourself on Tinder, use the “Have you seen enough to make a decision?” and you’ll spend less time selling and start closing.



Your trial close is a measurement, not a commitment.

You measure where they are at. It’s the best diagnostic tool you have. It could be something like, “Sir, on the scale of 1-10, how would you rate your new phone?


HERE ARE SOME TRIAL CLOSES YOU CAN USE:

  • Hey, it looks like you really like this, is that true?

  • If you took this home would you be proud to own this?

  • Do you prefer the larger or smaller version?

  • How would this look in your home?

These trial closes are assumption closes.


It’s like a recipe and you are checking to see if the oven is hot enough. Is the water boiling yet? Do you have mental ownership?


The trial close is indirect. Use it after you’ve done a strong pitch with your features, advantages, and benefits.


What do you want your new “thing” to do, that your last “thing” doesn’t do?

You can start trial closing even in the product selection. You can ask trial closes throughout your demonstration. Don’t wait until the end.


I knew a guy who would wait until after a 35-minute product demonstration before asking any trial closes. I told him, “you need to be asking people every 6 to 8 minutes”.


KEEP CHECKING THE TEMPERATURE


Be ready to get some reactions to trial closes. People will tell you that you’re moving too fast. “Slow down! I told you I’m not buying today.”


You want to start getting these objections because you are moving them down the path of the sales process.


Remember that customers don’t just buy products.


Whether they are buying a computer or a car, people wonder who’s going to take care of them. Who’s going to service them and back them?


People look around at your company and are asking themselves if the staff is friendly and reliable. It doesn’t matter what you’re selling, sell the rest of the assets. Your buyer must have confidence in you and your company.


Make them feel like family and make efficient use of people’s time. Buyers want to know that somebody will be there for them tomorrow.


Introduce them to other departments. Introduce them to management.

Once you get hit with objections in trial closes, you need to know how to answer them.


HERE ARE SOME OF MY FAVORITES:


“I’m not buying today.”

Your Response: “Sir, that would be my fault, not yours.”

“We’re not buying until…”

Your Response: “No problem, let me give you some idea of cost when you are ready.”

“I need my wife, I need the CEO, I need my husband…”

Your Response: “I appreciate that, and I would want that as well. I want that person involved, follow me.

“I don’t have time…”

Your Response: “Sir, I understand you don’t have time, and time is valuable to you. I knew when you got here that you were short on time. Let’s get you some figures that you can live with so you can avoid spending any more of your time doing this.”


There are many more objections you’ll face trial closing and many, many more objections when you actually try and close.


Universities around the nation should have curriculums on handling objections, but they don’t. Most salespeople don’t even know the difference between an objection and a complaint!




4 TYPES OF COMMON OBJECTIONS SALESPEOPLE GET:


1. TIME OBJECTIONS

I’m on my lunch break“, “I’ve only got 10 minutes“, “give me your card, I’m in a hurry“…what kind of customer acts like this?


Anyone who brings up time before you even have them on a product is a buyer.

Time indicates players and professionals. If someone tells you they are in a hurry, know they have a credit card on them and that they are a decision maker. If someone hits you with “I’ve only got 5 minutes”, reply, “5 minutes is perfect, let’s get busy.”


Don’t fight him over the five minutes. If he wants to hook up in five minutes, you should be good. The only reason a sales process takes time is your consideration of how long a sale should take, or you don’t handle people right.


Train yourself